Enterprise Tech Journal 2016-17: Issue 6 : Page 53

An IT service intelligence approach extends ITSSM and can show a dashboard of “lights” where each represents a system or entity that may or may not be a composite of many moving parts from across the enterprise. normal and this was presented to them before it became noticeable to the user community, then you have immediately bought yourself precious time—time you can use to fix the problem and keep the outside world working. Fortunately, ITSSM tools such as Splunk’s IT Service Intelligence (ITSI) now have this view, which covers all the elements involved in delivery of the service. Configured metrics are gathered from all your platforms into a single repository for comparison and correlation against your acceptability criteria (see Figure 2). An IT service intelligence approach extends ITSSM and can show a dashboard of “lights” where each represents a system or entity that may or may not be a composite of many moving parts from across the enterprise. Factoring metric values against your threshold definitions, it can give you a heads-up on something going off track such as the online banking logon process. It alerts you to what is trending toward a problem that may impact the delivery of the service so you can drill into it then, before the service itself becomes degraded to the customer or user (see Figure 3). I know this from personal experience as I developed the module for integrating mainframe-based metrics into the aforementioned ITSI tool. I know the mainframe gap can be filled by bringing in real-time performance metrics and failure indicators from production machines, DB2 databases and CICS transaction processing systems. Indicators for critical transactions, performance and bottlenecks allow the mainframe to join all the other mechanisms and components in the infrastructure on the same single pane of glass (aka “glass table”). The frontline team finally has full visibility across the entire enterprise and can avoid those ugly mainframe-distributed conference calls to determine what crippled the service (and which team was to blame). They can now drive down the virtual freeway (rocking the Bee Gees to the max) confident that a dashboard light will tell when something starts to go wrong and, hopefully, before it becomes a major issue to the “driver.” ETJ Ian Hartley is a senior solutions architect for Syncsort’s Mainframe Business Unit. He has 30 years’ industry experience, including roles as a systems and solution architect, software engineer and senior developer. He is based in London, UK, and is a graduate of The Open University. Email: ihartley@syncsort.com E n te rp r i s e  T e c h  J o u rn a l  •  W i n te r  2 0 1 6 / 2 0 1 7  •  53

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